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Hey friends — we’re on the planning committee for a very exciting series of events coming up in May of this year: Marxfest, a month-long celebration of all things Marx Brothers in the brothers’ hometown, NYC.

You can check out the calendar of events here (more are to be added very shortly): www.marxfest.com

We’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign to help cover expenses (this is not a for-profit endeavor), so please, follow the link below, view the video and chip in if you can. Any amount is appreciated, but there are some very cool premiums available at various levels of support.

And by all means, please share this with every Marx Brothers fan (in other words, every right-thinking citizen of the world) you know!

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/k72ndst/marx-brothers-festival-new-york

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In 1926, gossip columnist Jimmy Starr authored “365 Nights in Hollywood,” a collection of short stories about Tinseltown. It was published in a limited edition of 1000, each one signed and numbered by the author.

Here’s Part One of “The Twenty-Foot Kiss,” a not-so-short story from that 1926 collection: http://www.cladriteradio.com/archives/7758

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Mary Astor was never the biggest of stars, but she was a venerable one and a darned good actress. The good folks at Turner Classic Movies are honoring her as their Star of the Month, devoting Wednesday nights (into Thursday mornings) throughout March to feature her impressive output.

And TCM has picked a worthy offering to begin their tribute: DODSWORTH (1936), which airs at 8:00pm ET. Walter Huston and Ruth Chatterton are the stars of this terrific picture, but Astor shines as “the other woman.” You can also catch one of Astor’s many silent pictures (her career dates to 1920) tonight at midnight: DON JUAN (1926), in which she appears alongside such fellow luminaries as John Barrymore, Myrna Loy and even Hedda Hopper.

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In 1926, gossip columnist Jimmy Starr authored “365 Nights in Hollywood,” a collection of short stories about Tinseltown. It was published in a limited edition of 1000, each one signed and numbered by the author.

Here’s “Bunk Boulevard,” a story from that 1926 collection: http://www.cladriteradio.com/archives/7730

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Our aunt recently presented us with a stack of photographs, letters and other documents that had belonged to her parents (our grandparents), and below is the announcement our parents sent out on the occasion of our birth (to give it proper context, we should explain that our father, who’s still going strong at 85, was, for more than thirty years, a Volvo dealer).

This pleases us to no end, we have to say. It’s so clever, and we love imagining our folks, who were 29 and 25 at the time, working on this together. Click through to see all the images at full size; they’ll give you a smile.

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In 1926, gossip columnist Jimmy Starr authored “365 Nights in Hollywood,” a collection of short stories about Tinseltown. It was published in a limited edition of 1000, each one signed and numbered by the author.

Here’s “The Ghost Run,” a story from that 1926 collection: http://www.cladriteradio.com/archives/7726

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In 1926, gossip columnist Jimmy Starr authored “365 Nights in Hollywood,” a collection of short stories about Tinseltown. It was published in a limited edition of 1000, each one signed and numbered by the author.

Here’s “Synthetic Scenarios,” a story from that 1926 collection: http://www.cladriteradio.com/archives/7720

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Happy Valentine’s Day to Cladrite Radio listeners and readers everywhere!

And a virtual box of chocolates goes out to anyone who can name the lovely cupid in this picture!

And check out these free Valentine’s Day-themed old-time radio programs from OTRCat!

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In 1926, gossip columnist Jimmy Starr authored “365 Nights in Hollywood,” a collection of short stories about Tinseltown. It was published in a limited edition of 1000, each one signed and numbered by the author.

Here’s Part 2 of “Stealing Cupid’s Stuff,” a not-so-short story from that 1926 collection: http://www.cladriteradio.com/archives/7699

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The great Roy Smeck, born on this date in 1900, is widely remembered today as a master of the ukulele, but he could play just about anything with strings on it, as evidenced by the following video. Happy birthday, Roy.